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#news How thousands of Britons queued to see George VI lying in state in Westminster Hall in 1952 #WorldNews

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#information How thousands of Britons queued to see George VI lying in state in Westminster Hall in 1952 #WorldNews

It was shortly after 3am on a chilly and moist February morning that the final of the solemn mourners filed previous the majestic coffin of King George VI lying at relaxation in Westminster Hall. 

The king had died peacefully in his sleep on February 6, 1952, when his daughter and inheritor – the then Princess Elizabeth – was in Kenya together with her husband Prince Philip.   

In the area of simply three days up to February 15, simply over 301,000 individuals queued for almost 4 miles to pay their respects to the monarch who had led Britain by the darkish days of the Second World War. 

The Daily Mail reported on the time how, on the ultimate day of the 72-hour lying-in-state interval, greater than 100,000 individuals filed previous in the area of simply 19 hours.

They persevered regardless of being battered by rain and sleet and having to address freezing temperatures and snow on the bottom.  

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The 300,000 determine matched the numbers for Sir Winston Churchill lying in state in 1965 and outstripped the 200,000 seen for the Queen Mother in 2002. 

The transferring scenes might be repeated from later at the moment when the coffin of Her Majesty the Queen arrives at Westminster Hall to lie in state in the identical spot as her beloved father.

Around 10,000 mourners have begun forming an orderly queue that’s set to stretch 5 miles and final up to 40 hours. 

The queue for the lying-in-state of King George VI is seen extending along the south bank of the Thames by St Thomas's Hospital as far as the eye can see. The image was taken on February 13, 1952 - the second day of the lying-in-state period

The queue for the lying-in-state of King George VI is seen extending alongside the south financial institution of the Thames by St Thomas’s Hospital so far as the attention can see. The picture was taken on February 13, 1952 – the second day of the lying-in-state interval

The mourners persevered despite being battered by rain and sleet and having to cope with freezing temperatures and snow on the ground. Above: The queue is seen stretching down both sides of Lambeth Bridge

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The mourners persevered regardless of being battered by rain and sleet and having to address freezing temperatures and snow on the bottom. Above: The queue is seen stretching down either side of Lambeth Bridge

Policemen organise the crowds of people queuing in the rain to view King George VI lying in state at Westminster Hall. The line stretched across Lambeth Bridge down to Albert Embankment and Westminster Bridge, where it turned back on itself

Policemen organise the crowds of individuals queuing in the rain to view King George VI lying in state at Westminster Hall. The line stretched throughout Lambeth Bridge down to Albert Embankment and Westminster Bridge, the place it turned again on itself

Hundreds of people are seen inside Westminster Hall as they pay their respects to King George VI while he lies in state

Hundreds of persons are seen inside Westminster Hall as they pay their respects to King George VI whereas he lies in state

King George VI handed away whereas affected by lung most cancers. 

The discover saying his loss of life learn: ‘The King, who retired to relaxation final evening in his common well being, handed peacefully away in his sleep early this morning.’ 

Princess Elizabeth was then proclaimed Queen in her absence by the Accession Council earlier than she and Philip returned to London from Kenya on February 7. 

Her Majesty then formally proclaimed herself Queen and Head of the Commonwealth and Defender of the Faith on at St James’s Palace. 

The King’s casket was taken by practice from Sandringham to London, the place it then made its means to Westminster Hall.

Reporting on the final hours of the lying-in-state on February 15, 1952, the Daily Mail stated: ‘The queue exterior Westminster Hall, which at one time stretched ten deep from Parliament Square throughout either side of Lambeth Bridge, thinned after midnight.

‘At 2.25 a.m. the final of the queuers entered the corridor. The doorways have been saved open and lots of of individuals continued to arrive. They have been ready to go in with out ready. 

‘At 3 a.m. 116,277 had filed previous the catafalque – a complete of 301,369 since Tuesday.’

The moving scenes will be repeated from later today when the coffin of Her Majesty the Queen arrives at Westminster Hall to lie in state in the same spot as her beloved father. Around 10,000 mourners have begun forming an orderly queue that is set to stretch five miles and last up to 40 hours. Above: The queue on the South bank

The transferring scenes might be repeated from later at the moment when the coffin of Her Majesty the Queen arrives at Westminster Hall to lie in state in the identical spot as her beloved father. Around 10,000 mourners have begun forming an orderly queue that’s set to stretch 5 miles and final up to 40 hours. Above: The queue on the South financial institution

People queuing along Lambeth Bridge to pay their last respects to King George VI as he lay in state in Westminster Hall in 1952

People queuing alongside Lambeth Bridge to pay their final respects to King George VI as he lay in state in Westminster Hall in 1952

The queue to see King George VI is seen stretching across the road near Lambeth Bridge. The line eventually stretched for nearly four miles

The queue to see King George VI is seen stretching throughout the street close to Lambeth Bridge. The line finally stretched for almost 4 miles

Hundreds of mourners queue along the Thames as the lights of Lambeth Bridge are seen glowing in the background

Hundreds of mourners queue alongside the Thames because the lights of Lambeth Bridge are seen glowing in the background

Lambeth Bridge is seen packed with people queuing to pay their respects to King George VI in Westminster Hall in February 1952

Lambeth Bridge is seen filled with individuals queuing to pay their respects to King George VI in Westminster Hall in February 1952

The enormous queue of people waiting to pay their final respects to King George VI is seen stretching down towards Parliament

The monumental queue of individuals ready to pay their ultimate respects to King George VI is seen stretching down in direction of Parliament

The then famous boxer Alex Buxton is seen (centre in long coat) among the people queuing to pay their respects to King George

The then well-known boxer Alex Buxton is seen (centre in lengthy coat) among the many individuals queuing to pay their respects to King George

After the lying-in-state got here to an finish, the King’s coffin made it means in a solemn procession  

 At midnight, a big space of the West End had been sealed off to visitors.

BBC presenter Richard Dimbleby stated through the broadcast of the Westminster Hall proceedings, stated: ‘Never safer, higher guarded, lay a sleeping king than this, with a golden candlelight to heat his resting place, and the muffled footsteps of his devoted topics to maintain him firm.’ 

On the day of the funeral, February 15, George’s coffin was draped in the royal commonplace, with a crown, orb and sceptre lain on high. 

It then made its means in a proper televised procession to Paddington Station. It was carried on a gun carriage that was hauled by Royal Navy seamen because the Queen, the Queen Mother and Princess Margaret have been amongst those that adopted.

Mourners are seen today queuing along the Thames opposite the Houses of Parliament to see the Queen's coffin in Westminster Hall

Mourners are seen at the moment queuing alongside the Thames reverse the Houses of Parliament to see the Queen’s coffin in Westminster Hall

People read books as they queue along the banks of the Thames opposite the Houses of Parliament to see the Queen for the last time

People learn books as they queue alongside the banks of the Thames reverse the Houses of Parliament to see the Queen for the final time

Royal fans camped out overnight and sheltered under their brollies in central London. Above: People queuing in Lambeth

Royal followers camped out in a single day and sheltered beneath their brollies in central London. Above: People queuing in Lambeth

Royal fans claim their spots to watch the arrival of the coffin of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at Westminster

Royal followers declare their spots to watch the arrival of the coffin of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at Westminster

Queues start to build up on Lambeth Embankment in London to see the Queen lie in state from this evening at Westminster Hall

Queues begin to construct up on Lambeth Embankment in London to see the Queen lie in state from this night at Westminster Hall

As it made it means by London, the bells of Big Ben rang out 56 instances, with every chime representing a 12 months of the late King’s life. 

Once at Paddington, the coffin was taken to Windsor, the place a easy service was held for the King in St George’s Chapel, the place successive monarchs have been buried for hundreds of years. 

When the funeral acquired underway at 2pm, the nation fell silent, with even passengers on a transatlantic flight to New York rising from their seats to bow their heads. 

The service, in which tv cameras have been banned, was presided over by the then Archbishop of Canterbury Geoffrey Fisher and the Archbishop of York Cyril Garbett.

Once the service was over, George was buried in the Royal Vault of St George’s Chapel. Elizabeth’s ultimate tribute to her father was to drop a handful of earth that she had collected from Frogmore at Windsor on his coffin. 

There were similar queues when Winston Churchill lay in state in Westminster Hall after his death in January 1965 at the age of 90

There have been comparable queues when Winston Churchill lay in state in Westminster Hall after his loss of life in January 1965 on the age of 90

Members of the public pay their respects to Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965) during his lying-in-state in Westminster Hall

Members of the general public pay their respects to Winston Churchill (1874 – 1965) throughout his lying-in-state in Westminster Hall

The queue to view the coffin of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, as it lay in state in Westminster Hall after her death in 2002

The queue to view the coffin of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, because it lay in state in Westminster Hall after her loss of life in 2002

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