#news Yeoman of the Guard set up by Henry VII are among units guarding the Queen #WorldNews

#news Yeoman of the Guard set up by Henry VII are among units guarding the Queen #WorldNews

#information Yeoman of the Guard set up by Henry VII are among units guarding the Queen #WorldNews

They are the males who are ready to offer their lives for the monarch. 

As the Queen lies in state in Westminster Hall till Monday, her coffin is being watched over by a 24-hour rotation of bodyguards. 

Although they are not as historic as the monarchy itself, the Yeomen of the Guard, Royal Company of Archers and Gentlemen at Arms are all have illustrious pasts that stretch again centuries.

Familiar from their presence at the State Opening of Parliament, the Yeomen of the Guard is the oldest unit of Royal bodyguards, having been based 537 years in the past in 1485 by King Henry VII after his victory over Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth. They are all the time current when a monarch lies in state. 

The Gentlemen at Arms, who are usually armed with a spear and lance, have acted as an escort for the monarch since being created by Henry VIII, in 1509. 

They are in attendance at many essential events, together with the State Opening of Parliament, the arrivals of visiting heads of state and backyard events hosted by the monarch. They guarded King George VI when he lay in state in Westminster Hall 70 years earlier than his daughter in 1952. 

The Royal Company of Archers, who have been created in 1676, act as the Sovereign’s Body Guard in Scotland and are current at any state or ceremonial event north of the border. They have been current for the Queen Mother’s lying-in-state in 2002. 

Also participating in vigil duties are members of the Grenadier Guards, who are well-known for his or her good purple tunics and bearskin hats after they carry out ceremonial duties outdoors the likes of Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle. 

Both Scottish Secretary Alister Jack and Defence Secretary Ben Wallace are members of the Royal Company of Archers – as a result of their earlier service in the armed forces – and will probably be participating in the vigil right this moment.

Last evening, an archer who was guarding Her Majesty’s coffin after its arrival from Buckingham Palace dramatically fainted, prompting law enforcement officials to hurry to his aide. It got here after one other archer collapsed when the Queen’s coffin was being carried out of St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh on Thursday. 

As the Queen lies in state in Westminster Hall until Monday, her coffin is being watched over by a 24-hour rotation of bodyguards. Above: Members of the Yeomen of the Guard (left and far right) on duty alongside the Gentlemen at Arms

As the Queen lies in state in Westminster Hall till Monday, her coffin is being watched over by a 24-hour rotation of bodyguards. Above: Members of the Yeomen of the Guard (left and much proper) on responsibility alongside the Gentlemen at Arms

Her Majesty's coffin arrived in Westminster Hall from Buckingham Palace yesterday. It is seen draped in the Royal Standard, with the Imperial State Crown on top

Her Majesty’s coffin arrived in Westminster Hall from Buckingham Palace yesterday. It is seen draped in the Royal Standard, with the Imperial State Crown on high

Yeomen of the Guard 

The 24-hour vigil in Westminster Hall is being broke into 4 six-hour shifts. The guards stand vigil for 20 minutes at a time earlier than rotating. 

Distinctive of their Tudor uniforms of purple, white and yellow, the King’s Body Guard of the Yeomen of the Guard are the oldest of the monarch’s defenders.

The guards have been created after the Battle of Bosworth, when Henry VII – Henry VIII’s father – defeated Richard III in what was the defining battle of the War of the Roses. 

The 24-hour vigil in Westminster Hall is being broke into four six-hour shifts. The guards stand vigil for 20 minutes at a time before rotating. Distinctive in their Tudor uniforms of red, white and yellow, the King's Body Guard of the Yeomen of the Guard are the oldest of the monarch's defenders

The 24-hour vigil in Westminster Hall is being broke into 4 six-hour shifts. The guards stand vigil for 20 minutes at a time earlier than rotating. Distinctive of their Tudor uniforms of purple, white and yellow, the King’s Body Guard of the Yeomen of the Guard are the oldest of the monarch’s defenders

When Henry was protected in the battle by his devoted guards, he rewarded them by formally establishing the Yeomen. 

The guards were created after the Battle of Bosworth, when Henry VII - Henry VIII's father - defeated Richard III

The guards have been created after the Battle of Bosworth, when Henry VII – Henry VIII’s father – defeated Richard III

The Yeomen continued to have an lively position in guarding the monarchs that adopted Henry VII, however now have a purely ceremonial position. 

They are now made up of 73 servicemen who are all former warrant or non-commissioned officers. They are aged between 42 and 55 and have served for no less than 22 years in the navy. 

There are 4 ranks of Yeomen officer: Exon, Ensign, Lieutenant and Captain. Yeoman ranks beneath officer embrace Yeoman, Yeoman Bed Hanger (YBH), Yeoman Bed Goer (YBG), Divisional Sergeant-Major (DSM) and Messenger Sergeant-Major (MSM).

They participate in the annual Royal Maundy Service, when the monarch distributes silver cash to native pensioners.

They are additionally current in any respect investitures and summer time backyard events at Buckingham Palace. 

However, the Yeomen of the Guard are not the similar as Yeomen Warders, who guard the Tower of London. This is regardless of the incontrovertible fact that their uniforms are virtually an identical. 

They carry a sword, which isn’t drawn, and a halberd known as a ‘partisan’.  

When Henry was protected in the battle by his devoted guards, he rewarded them by formally establishing the Yeomen. Above: Henry is depicted being crowned after the battle, while surrounded by his guards

When Henry was protected in the battle by his devoted guards, he rewarded them by formally establishing the Yeomen. Above: Henry is depicted being topped after the battle, whereas surrounded by his guards  

The Queen is seen beaming as she inspects the Yeomen of the Guard on the lawns of Buckingham Palace in June 1982

The Queen is seen beaming as she inspects the Yeomen of the Guard on the lawns of Buckingham Palace in June 1982

Gentlemen at Arms 

His Majesty’s Body Guard of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms have been initially known as the Troop of Gentlemen after they have been shaped by King Henry VIII to behave as a mounted escort. 

The guard accompanied Henry to France in 1513, the place they took half in the Battle of Guinegate towards the French. The battle resulted in a victory for England and their allies, the Holy Roman Empire. 

The males grew to become a dismounted bodyguard later in the sixteenth Century and have been as an alternative armed with battleaxes. 

The unit final noticed lively service throughout the English Civil War and have been on common responsibility till the nineteenth Century. 

Now, their position is only ceremonial. They guard the monarch throughout the arrivals of heads of state and the State Opening of Parliament. 

At backyard events, they are tasked with forming the lanes via which members of the Royal Family stroll. 

#news Yeoman of the Guard set up by Henry VII are among units guarding the Queen #WorldNews

His Majesty’s Body Guard of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen at Arms have been initially known as the Troop of Gentlemen after they have been shaped by King Henry VIII to behave as a mounted escort. Now, their position is only ceremonial. They guard the monarch throughout the arrivals of heads of state and the State Opening of Parliament. Above: A member of the unit guarding the Queen’s coffin in Westminster Hall yesterday

Now, their role is purely ceremonial. They guard the monarch during the arrivals of heads of state and the State Opening of Parliament. Above: Gentlemen of the Guard are seen following Yeomen of the Guard as they enter Westminster Hall on Monday

Now, their position is only ceremonial. They guard the monarch throughout the arrivals of heads of state and the State Opening of Parliament. Above: Gentlemen of the Guard are seen following Yeomen of the Guard as they enter Westminster Hall on Monday

They are made up of 5 officers, and 27 ‘Gentlemen’. The senior officer – the Captain – is now all the time the Chief Whip in the House of Lords. 

The Gentlemen at Arms put on a skirted purple coat with blue velvet cuffs, lengthy white gloves and white swan feather plumes. 

They wield cavalry swords and ceremonial battle-axes, some of which are greater than 300 years outdated.

Royal Company of Archers 

The Royal Company of Archers carry out duties at the request of the monarch at any state or ceremonial event. 

They have been initially shaped in the seventeenth Century as a non-public archery membership in Scotland. 

Today, their most common responsibility is at the monarch’s annual backyard social gathering at the Palace of Holyrood House. 

During the Queen’s reign, round 120 members would kind avenues down which visitors chosen at random can be introduced ahead to satisfy Her Majesty. 

The Royal Company of Archers perform duties at the request of the monarch at any state or ceremonial occasion. They were initially formed in the 17th Century as a private archery club in Scotland. Above: Archers are seen in black guarding the Queen's coffin yesterday, moments before one of them fainted

The Royal Company of Archers carry out duties at the request of the monarch at any state or ceremonial event. They have been initially shaped in the seventeenth Century as a non-public archery membership in Scotland. Above: Archers are seen in black guarding the Queen’s coffin yesterday, moments earlier than one of them fainted

Archers are seen guarding the Queen's coffin when Her Majesty lay at rest in Edinburgh's St Giles' Cathedral earlier this week

Archers are seen guarding the Queen’s coffin when Her Majesty lay at relaxation in Edinburgh’s St Giles’ Cathedral earlier this week

King George VI is seen with his wife Queen Elizabeth and daughters Princess Elizabeth and Princess Margaret during an inspection of the Royal Company of Archers in 1937

King George VI is seen along with his spouse Queen Elizabeth and daughters Princess Elizabeth and Princess Margaret throughout an inspection of the Royal Company of Archers in 1937

Their different main responsibility is attendance outdoors Edinburgh’s St Giles’ Cathedral at the service of set up of the Knights of the Thistle, whose membership is set solely by the monarch. 

The Royal Company of Archers nonetheless features as an archery membership. Members should be Scots or have sturdy Scottish connections and are chosen by election. 

Their distinctive uniform is made up of a darkish inexperienced tunic with black facings, darkish inexperienced trousers bearing a black and crimson stripe and a bonnet boasting the firm’s badge and an eagle feather.  

When on responsibility, they carry picket bows.  

Mr Jack and Mr Wallace are each anticipated to be concerned in the vigil round the Queen’s coffin this afternoon. 

After the Queen’s dying at Balmoral in Scotland final week, Mr Wallace mentioned she had ‘devoted her life to serving her nation’.

Speaking about the Queen after her dying was introduced, Mr Jack acknowledged: ‘Her lengthy reign was outlined by onerous work and devoted public service, incomes her the respect and devotion of her residents.’

The Royal Company of Archers at are seen outside St Giles' Cathedral in Edinburgh earlier this week as they took part in the procession accompanying Her Majesty's coffin

The Royal Company of Archers at are seen outdoors St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh earlier this week as they took half in the procession accompanying Her Majesty’s coffin

The Royal Company of Archers leave St Giles' Cathedral, in Edinburgh, on September 12. The Company still functions as an archery club. Members have to be Scots or have strong Scottish connections and are chosen by election

The Royal Company of Archers depart St Giles’ Cathedral, in Edinburgh, on September 12. The Company nonetheless features as an archery membership. Members should be Scots or have sturdy Scottish connections and are chosen by election

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