#sports Mickey Mantle's card sells for $12.6million - making it the most expensive sports item of ALL-TIME

#sports Mickey Mantle’s card sells for $12.6million – making it the most expensive sports item of ALL-TIME

#sports Mickey Mantle’s card sells for $12.6million – making it the most expensive sports item of ALL-TIME

Table of Contents

Mickey Mantle’s ‘most iconic put up-struggle card in the world’ sells for document $12.6MILLION – making it the most expensive sports item of ALL-TIME!

  • Yankees legend Mickey Mantle’s 1952 Topps card bought for $12.6m on Saturday
  • It obliterated the document of $7.25m set by a Honus Wagner card earlier this month
  • The 9.5-grade card had already reached bids above $7m two weeks in the past 
  • Mantle performed 18 seasons with NY and is taken into account one the best of all-time

 There is a brand new clubhouse chief in the sports memorabilia world.

A card of New York Yankees legend Mickey Mantle has bought for an astonishing $12.6million, making it the most expensive sports item ever at public sale.

It destroyed the beforehand held document by over $5m, set earlier this month for a T206 Honus Wagner graded SGC 2. 

The 1952 Mickey Mantle card has broken the record for most expensive sports item ever

The 1952 Mickey Mantle card has damaged the document for most expensive sports item ever

Before Heritage Auctions kicked off the bidding on July 25, it was speculated the Mantle relic may fetch upwards of $10m. 

Just two weeks in the past the 9.5-grade 1952 Topps card had already hit $6.35m – $7.62m with Buyer’s Premium.

‘This card is arguably the most interesting-situation instance of the most iconic put up-struggle card in the world,’ Chris Ivy, Heritage’s director of sports auctions, stated through an announcement. 

‘That grade, plus the reality it has documented provenance from the most storied discover in pastime historical past, places this card in a class of its personal.’ 

Mantle was a legend of baseball and played all 18 seasons of his career with the Yankees

Mantle was a legend of baseball and performed all 18 seasons of his profession with the Yankees

The 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle No. 311 is one of the most legendary baseball playing cards of all time and is also known as the slugger’s rookie card, though it is, in actual fact, not, as it was launched the 12 months after he made his debut for the New York Yankees. 

This particular instance has been dubbed ‘The Rosen Find’ as it was discovered amongst 5,500 playing cards that included 75 1952 Mantles bought by collector Alan Rosen throughout the Nineteen Eighties. 

It is the ‘most interesting’ of the pack in response to Rosen, who was arguably the main skilled in previous sports playing cards throughout his lifetime, and was formally graded this summer time with a pristine 9.5 through SGC.

Collector Alan Rosen, who found the card in the 1980s, dubbed it the 'finest example'

Collector Alan Rosen, who discovered the card in the Nineteen Eighties, dubbed it the ‘most interesting instance’

In 1991, he bought the card to Anthony Giordano for $50,000, briefly making it the world’s most expensive. 

Now it has reclaimed the title in type as bidding closed Saturday. Until now, Giordano had spent a long time rejecting multi-million greenback gives for the sporting artefact.  

Mantle was a legend of the recreation and performed all 18 seasons of his profession with the Yankees.

Rosen sold the 1952 Topps card to Anthony Giordano in 1991 for a then-record of $50,000U

Rosen bought the 1952 Topps card to Anthony Giordano in 1991 for a then-document of $50,000U

The change-hitting heart fielder is seen as one of the best offensive weapons from the place. 

He received seven World Series titles, was a 3-time AL MVP and was inducted to the Hall of Fame in 1974, the first 12 months he was eligible. 

During the 1956 and 1957 seasons, Mantle received again-to-again MVP awards, smashing 52 and 34 dwelling runs, and hitting .353 and .365 respectively. 

‘The Commerce Comet’ completed his profession with 2,415 hits, 536 dwelling runs and a .298 batting common.

Advertisement

Leave a Comment