#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

Britons trying to in the reduction of because of the cost-of-living disaster at the moment are having to fork out extra for his or her favorite snacks and lunches attributable to hovering costs at common excessive road chains, MailOnline can reveal.

Lunchtime favourites together with a Greggs sausage roll, a Big Mac meal and a Pret Tuna and Cucumber Baguette have all risen in price in current months – with some objects rising by as a lot as 50p.

It comes after fast-food chain McDonalds final month raised the price of its iconic – and as soon as seemingly inflation-beating – 99p cheeseburger to £1.19. It was the primary time the burger’s price had been elevated in greater than 14 years.

Meanwhile, pub and informal eating chains are additionally steadily rising their costs, analysis by MailOnline has discovered.

A Nandos half rooster and two sides has shot up from £11.20 to £13 in the final two years, whereas a traditional La Reine from Pizza Express is now 75p dearer than it was in 2020.

Even Wetherspoon, identified for its cut-price drinks and dinners, is having to up their menu costs. The chain’s common three plates for £10 deal is now as a lot as £12.50 in some areas, whereas its equally common large breakfast is now 30p dearer than it was final 12 months.

It comes as all eating places and seize and go spots face a double whammy of accelerating prices. Ingredients reminiscent of flour and cooking oils have all gone up in price as a knock on from Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, whereas outlets, cafes and eating places are additionally feeling the pinch attributable to spiraling gasoline costs.

But the rising costs might knock client confidence in the grab-and-go market, with prospects already attempting to tighten their belt because of the wider cost-of-living squeeze.

Britons are already reducing again as they brace for whopping vitality payments this winter, coupled with inflated meals costs at supermarkets. And there are fears that inflation itself might hit 15 per cent in the UK this winter, if vitality costs proceed to rise.

Pubs are already turning out the lights as hovering vitality payments hit the ailing hospitality sector – with final orders being made hours earlier, meals being reduce and skeleton groups operating venues to keep away from monetary damage.  

Celebrity chef Tom Kerridge revealed yesterday that the electrical energy invoice at one in all his pubs will soar from £60,000 to a staggering £420,000 a 12 months as Britain’s hospitality sector faces monetary damage this winter. 

Lunchtime favourites including a Greggs sausage roll, a Big Mac meal and a Pret Tuna and Cucumber baguette have all risen in price in recent months - with some items increasing by as much as 50p. Prices may differ in some locations. McDonalds runs a franchise system, meaning franchisees set their own prices based on recommendations. Pret says its price differs, with higher than usual price in its stores at railway stations. Filter coffee has increased twice in the last two years, first to £1.25 and then to £1.40 in shops, and £1.50 at stations

Lunchtime favourites together with a Greggs sausage roll, a Big Mac meal and a Pret Tuna and Cucumber baguette have all risen in price in current months – with some objects rising by as a lot as 50p. Prices might differ in some areas. McDonalds runs a franchise system, that means franchisees set their very own costs based mostly on suggestions. Pret says its price differs, with greater than typical price in its shops at railway stations. Filter espresso has elevated twice in the final two years, first to £1.25 after which to £1.40 in outlets, and £1.50 at stations

Pub and casual dining chains are also steadily increasing their prices, research by MailOnline has found. A Nandos half chicken and two sides has shot up from £11.20 to £13 in the last two years, while a classic La Reine from Pizza Express is now 75p more expensive than it was in 2020. Even Wetherspoon, known for its cut-price drinks and dinners, is having to up their menu prices. The chain's popular three plates for £10 deal is now as much as £12.50 in some locations, while its equally popular big breakfast is now 30p more expensive than it was last year

Pub and informal eating chains are additionally steadily rising their costs, analysis by MailOnline has discovered. A Nandos half rooster and two sides has shot up from £11.20 to £13 in the final two years, whereas a traditional La Reine from Pizza Express is now 75p dearer than it was in 2020. Even Wetherspoon, identified for its cut-price drinks and dinners, is having to up their menu costs. The chain’s common three plates for £10 deal is now as a lot as £12.50 in some areas, whereas its equally common large breakfast is now 30p dearer than it was final 12 months

It comes as analysis by MailOnline exhibits how main grab-and-go and informal eating manufacturers have elevated their costs in the final two years, or much less.

How costs are going up at eating places reminiscent of Pizza Express, Nandos and Wetherspoon and at grab-and-go chains reminiscent of McDonalds, Greggs and Pret

Pizza Express

Dough balls ‘PizzaExpress’

Was: £4.25

Now: £5.25

Classic La Reine Pizza

Was: £12.70

Now: £13.45

Classic Lasagne

Was: £11.95

Now: £13.45

Nandos

Half rooster with two common sides

Was: £11.20

Now: £13

Grilled rooster burger with one aspect

Was: £8.75

Now: £9.80

10 wings

Was: £10.95

Now: £11.50

J.D Wetherspoon 

Small plates

Was: Three for £10

Now: Three for £12.50

Mixed grill with drink

Was: £9.65 (£10.95 with alcohol)

Now: £11.20 (£12.70 with alcohol)

Large breakfast

Was: £5.85

Now: £6.10

McDonalds

McDonalds 

Cheeseburger

Was: 99p

Now: £1.19 

Big Mac meal

Was: £5.09

Now: £5.39

Cappuccino

Was: £1.49

Now: £1.69

Pret

Tuna and Cucumber Baguette

Was: £3.30

Now: £3.80

Filter espresso

Was: 99p

Now: £1.40 (£1.50 in stations)

Monthly espresso subscription

Was: £20

Now: £25

Greggs

Sausage roll and vegan sausage roll

Was: £1.20

Now: £1.30

Steak bake, rooster bake, and sausage and bean soften

Was: £1.80

Now: £1.96

Yum Yum 

Was: 75p

Now: 81p

Triple chocolate doughnut and caramel doughnut

Was: £1

Now: £1.09

*All price will increase are throughout the final two years or much less. Some costs might differ in completely different areas, notably at Wetherspoon, which runs a regional pricing system. McDonalds additionally runs a franchise system, so whereas it recommends costs, they’re in the end set by the franchisee

Popular Italian-themed chain, Pizza Express, has elevated costs on all of its main menu objects.

Its common dough balls starter has risen by £1 in the final 12 months, whereas traditional pizzas have risen by 75p in some circumstances.

A traditional La Reine Pizza now prices £13.45 in most Pizza Express eating places, up from £12.70 final 12 months. Those hoping to chop the prices by going for a less expensive Margherita are additionally not going to have the ability to keep away from inflation, as a result of a traditional cheese and tomato pizza is now £9.95 – up a £1 from £8.95.

But one of many largest rises has been for Pizza Express’s traditional lasagne which is now £13.45, having beforehand been £11.95.

Similarly, grilled rooster chain Nandos has not managed to keep away from rising its costs. The common peri-peri model is now charging £13 for a half rooster with two common sides, up from £11.20 two years in the past.

Those with a choice for Nandos burgers are additionally having to fork out extra. A grilled rooster burger with one aspect was £8.75 – and is now £9.80.

And these on the lookout for a aspect will even have to dig deeper into their pockets, as a result of a 10wings plate has gone up by 65p, from £10.95 to £11.50.

At pub chain Wetherspoon, well-known for its reduce price drinks and dinners, costs are additionally going up. The pub chain’s common three small plates for £10 deal is now as much as £12.50. 

Similarly, Wetherspoon’s combined grill and a drink deal has gone up from £9.65 to £11.20 – £12.70 with alcohol.

And these hoping for a Wetherspoon breakfast – maybe to compel the earlier evening’s hangover – will even be forking out extra, with the chain’s massive breakfast now £6.10 – up from £5.85. 

Wetherspoon says its costs fluctuate between pubs and areas.  A spokesperson added: ‘Wetherspoon goals to maintain its costs as aggressive as doable and believes it presents glorious worth for cash on food and drinks in its pubs.’

Meanwhile, grab-and-go chains are additionally upping their costs, MailOnline’s analysis exhibits.

A Pret Tuna and Cucumber Baguette is now £3.80 in some areas, having been priced at £3.30. It comes after the favored lunchtime chain raised the price of its filter espresso during the last two years.

In 2020, prospects might bag a filter espresso from Pret for simply 99p. But after elevating the price to £1.25 final 12 months, Pret raised the price once more to £1.40 earlier this 12 months. It is at present priced at £1.50 in outlets at practice and tube stations – the place many commuters will purchase their drinks.

A regular flat white has risen from £2.85 to £3.15 in station shops. The chain has additionally lately elevated the price of its month-to-month subscription, which permits prospects to get 5 Barista-made drinks (natural coffees, teas, frappes, sizzling sweets) a day.

It comes after fast-food chain McDonalds final month raised the price of its iconic – and as soon as seemingly inflation-beating – 99p cheeseburger to £1.19. It was the primary time the burger’s price had been elevated in greater than 14 years.

Prices have additionally risen on numerous menu objects. But pricing varies from retailer to retailer, as a result of McDonalds runs a franchise system. It signifies that whereas McDonalds can suggest costs, it’s in the end as much as the franchisee to set them.

However, analysis by MailOnline exhibits that costs have elevated, in basic, on numerous objects, together with the enduring Big Mac medium meal. The meal, with drinks and a aspect, beforehand price £5.09, however now prices £5.39 – and £5.49 in some areas.

Other price enhance embrace to the McCafe vary. An everyday barista-style espresso, reminiscent of a cappuccino or flat white, now prices round £1.69, having beforehand been priced across the £1.49 mark.

A spokesperson for McDonalds mentioned earlier this 12 months, following the announcement of the price rises: ‘This summer season, our eating places can be including between 10p and 20p to numerous the menu objects impacted most by inflation.

‘We’ll be rising the price of our cheeseburger for the primary time in over 14 years, taking it from 99p to £1.19.

‘Some costs stay unaffected, and a few will proceed to fluctuate throughout our eating places. We perceive that any price will increase should not excellent news, however we have delayed and minimised these modifications for so long as we might.

‘We will proceed to hearken to what you need from us and work tirelessly to seek out options to at present’s price challenges affecting our enterprise.’

Meanwhile, bakers Greggs, one other chain identified for its reduce price goodies, can also be elevating its costs. The firm has been working to maintain product costs down – regardless of substances, packaging and vitality payments all rising.

However its iconic sausage roll, and its vegan various, is now going as much as £1.30, having beforehand been £1.20, and having as soon as been £1.

Its equally iconic steak bake, in addition to its rooster bake, and sausage and bean soften, are additionally set to go up, from £1.80 to £1.96.

Meanwhile, a triple chocolate doughnut and caramel doughnut are additionally rising in price, going over the £1 to £1.09.

But Greggs prospects also can nonetheless get one common merchandise for underneath a £1. A Yum Yum can be priced at 81p, up from 75p.

A Greggs spokesperson mentioned earlier this 12 months: ‘In a market the place client incomes are underneath strain Greggs presents distinctive worth for purchasers on the lookout for food and drinks on the go.

‘We are effectively positioned to navigate the extensively publicised challenges affecting the economic system and proceed to have a number of thrilling progress alternatives forward, with a transparent technique for enlargement.’

At pub chain Wetherspoon, well known for its cut price drinks and dinners, prices are also going up. The pub chain's popular three small plates for £10 deal is now up to £12.50

At pub chain Wetherspoon, well-known for its reduce price drinks and dinners, costs are additionally going up. The pub chain’s common three small plates for £10 deal is now as much as £12.50

Those hoping for a Wetherspoon breakfast - perhaps to compel the previous night's hangover - will also be forking out more, with the chain's large breakfast now £6.10 - up from £5.85

Those hoping for a Wetherspoon breakfast – maybe to compel the earlier evening’s hangover – will even be forking out extra, with the chain’s massive breakfast now £6.10 – up from £5.85

It comes after fast-food chain McDonalds last month raised the price of its iconic - and once seemingly inflation-beating - 99p cheeseburger to £1.19. It was the first time the burger's price had been increased in more than 14 years

It comes after fast-food chain McDonalds final month raised the price of its iconic – and as soon as seemingly inflation-beating – 99p cheeseburger to £1.19. It was the primary time the burger’s price had been elevated in greater than 14 years

At Pret, a standard flat white has risen from £2.85 to £3.15 in station stores. The chain has also recently increased the cost of its monthly subscription, which allows customers to get five Barista-made drinks (organic coffees, teas, frappes, hot chocolates) a day

At Pret, a typical flat white has risen from £2.85 to £3.15 in station shops. The chain has additionally lately elevated the price of its month-to-month subscription, which permits prospects to get 5 Barista-made drinks (natural coffees, teas, frappes, sizzling sweets) a day

A classic La Reine Pizza now costs £13.45 in most Pizza Express restaurants, up from £12.70 last year. Those hoping to cut the costs by going for a cheaper Margherita are also not going to be able to avoid inflation, because a classic cheese and tomato pizza is now £9.95 - up a £1 from £8.95

A traditional La Reine Pizza now prices £13.45 in most Pizza Express eating places, up from £12.70 final 12 months. Those hoping to chop the prices by going for a less expensive Margherita are additionally not going to have the ability to keep away from inflation, as a result of a traditional cheese and tomato pizza is now £9.95 – up a £1 from £8.95

Life in Blackout Britain: Experts warn vitality rationing this winter might see individuals informed to not cook dinner till after 8pm, pubs shut at 9pm, ‘three-day-a-week’ college, and swimming swimming pools left unheated 

The scale of vitality rationing which may be required at dwelling, in the NHS, faculties, care properties, outlets, pubs and on the streets of Britain due to surging vitality costs and the specter of blackouts is laid naked at present.

Experts have informed MailOnline there’s ‘no escape’ for the 66million individuals in the UK who can be inspired to chop their use of gasoline and electrical energy this winter and even flip off the lights when the wind drops. 

Kathryn Porter, from consultancy Watt-Logic, fears that the disaster will price lives in the approaching months and informed MailOnline: ‘We ought to preserve our fingers crossed for a heat and windy winter’. Ms Porter has mentioned that it is ‘very doable’ the UK will see plans for vitality rationing, regardless of Liz Truss, the doubtless subsequent prime minister, completely ruling it out, however the vitality skilled added: ‘It can be voluntary, asking individuals to make a small sacrifice to keep away from blackouts’.

Today it emerged that Britons could possibly be requested to restrict vitality use this winter to move off blackouts by avoiding utilizing gasoline and electrical energy at peak occasions in a transfer that may hit each a part of life.

At dwelling individuals could also be inspired to not use washing machines, dishwashers and ovens between 2pm and 8pm whereas charging vehicles earlier than 9pm can also be not suggested when related measures have been imposed in the US this 12 months. Abandoning the household weekday dinner at 6pm or the Sunday roast at 5pm could also be required and moved to after 8pm or swapped for a chilly dinner or leftovers.

The NHS Confederation has predicted that the answer for the well being service will ‘have to be made up by fewer workers being employed, longer ready occasions for care, or different areas of affected person care being in the reduction of’. NHS England steering says workers should turning off gear and lights and higher management temperatures in hospitals and surgical procedures. 

Schools have even mentioned three-day weeks and lessons could possibly be mixed to scale back the variety of rooms that require heating every day. 

While care properties are being compelled to take drastic motion to soak up hovering dwelling prices reminiscent of lowering menu choices, utilizing washing machines much less and reducing down on leisure and outside journeys for aged and susceptible residents. 

Pubs are already turning out the lights as hovering vitality payments hit the ailing hospitality sector – with final orders at 8.30pm and shutting by 9pm, meals service being stopped and skeleton groups operating venues to keep away from monetary damage. Beer gardens are even being shut at evening to avoid wasting prices.

And councils might select to repeat Germany the place road lights are being dimmed, visitors lights at quieter junctions are turned off, sizzling water and central heating is off in public buildings and monuments will not be lit in a single day. UK municipal swimming swimming pools could possibly be made colder to scale back heating payments.

It comes as movie star chef Tom Kerridge revealed that the electrical energy invoice at one in all his pubs will soar from £60,000 to a staggering £420,000 a 12 months as Britain’s hospitality sector faces monetary damage this winter. 

Mr Kerridge, who owns three pubs based mostly in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, mentioned yesterday he has been quoted an increase from £5,000 to £30,000 a month at one in all his companies. 

He mentioned the quote has come from his present electrical energy provider for when the contract ends in December and worries as a result of a lot of his home equipment use electrical energy – together with the stoves, the ovens and the fridges. 

Many British pubs are lowering their hours and shutting down as vitality payments skyrocket by tens of 1000’s of kilos, with pub homeowners calling for fast intervention from the incoming Prime Minister. 

Landlords are reporting 400% will increase in the price of their payments, prices they’re largely unable to chop because the require the gas to serve prospects.

President of the British Chambers of Commerce, Baroness Ruby McGregor-Smith, at present warned that two-thirds of pubs are vulnerable to closure amid the vitality price rise disaster.

Mr Kerridge mentioned he’ll store round to try to get his invoice lowered however mentioned from his first quote the annual sum ‘has gone from ‘£60,000 a 12 months to ‘£420,000 a 12 months’. 

‘It’s simply completely ludicrous and that is simply us as a enterprise. This is each enterprise – each enterprise is getting quoted that as a result of there isn’t any price cap on enterprise vitality,’ Mr Kerridge informed BBC Radio 5 Live.  

‘The numbers are so ridiculous and ludicrous that no surprise so many companies are closing and speaking of closing.’

Mr Kerridge, who additionally owns 5 eating places and bars, mentioned companies would face ‘harsh realities’ over the winter, in response to The Telegraph. 

He described it as a ‘terrifying and scary panorama’ for the sector.

1 / 4 of pub and lodge homeowners are contemplating closing over the Christmas interval to keep away from shedding cash, in response to analysis by the trade physique, UK Hospitality.

One landlady, whose vitality invoice has jumped from £8,000 to £33,000, informed MailOnline: ‘You actually should be up for operating a pub for the love of it because it’s actually to not earn a dwelling anymore!’

She mentioned she has needed to reduce down her menu, is now appearing chef as she can’t afford to make use of one, and turns the skin lights off to economize – however predicts that the longer term appears bleak.

Russell Imrie, who runs the Keavil House Hotel in Fife, mentioned that he’ll shut between December 23 and 27.

‘The quantity that we would wish to cost for lunches and dinners and for rooms over the Christmas interval can be at a stage that, I feel, the purchasers wouldn’t perceive why we have been charging these costs,’ he mentioned. 

It comes amid fears for vitality payments at different establishments together with museums,  care properties and faculties. 

‘We are merely on the stage the place many individuals won’t be able to warmth their properties over the winter and since there isn’t any cap on companies and public establishments, issues like museums are warning about shutting, aged care properties, faculties,’ Helen Lewis, author for The Atlantic informed BBC’s Today programme, discussing the large problem of the vitality disaster that may fall on the following Prime Minister. 

‘You can’t have a scenario in which youngsters are being requested to go in very chilly faculties after which coming dwelling to very chilly properties. That is one thing the federal government goes to have to do one thing greater than the introduced measures to cope with.’

Celebrity chef Tom Kerridge says the electricity bill at one of his pubs will soar from £60,000 to a £420,000 a year when the contract ends in December

Celebrity chef Tom Kerridge says the electrical energy invoice at one in all his pubs will soar from £60,000 to a £420,000 a 12 months when the contract ends in December

Mr Kerridge, who owns three pubs based in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, said businesses were going to face 'harsh realities' over the winter - Pictured is The Butcher's Tap and Grill

Mr Kerridge, who owns three pubs based mostly in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, mentioned companies have been going to face ‘harsh realities’ over the winter – Pictured is The Butcher’s Tap and Grill

Asked concerning the knock on impact of the vitality disaster, she added: ‘It’s a really chaotic drawback in the sense that issues would possibly drop out of provide chains that you’ve got merely by no means considered earlier than, going about your day by day life.

‘If there are random factories that make essential issues that may’t pay their payments and undergo shutdowns, or if we find yourself having some type of rationing or blackouts over the winter, that could be a very chaotic system to handle.’

She spoke concerning the NHS struggling to grapple with the after results of Covid, saying there isn’t any ‘let up’.

Every public service is crying out for cash, the author added, with inflation resulting in individuals wanting a pay rise so they aren’t shedding out.

£1.45 for ONE can of Heinz Beans! Despair as price of staple meals soars by as much as 20% in a 12 months with common price of 4 pints of milk up 34p to £1.49, spaghetti up 33p to 85p – and inflation now set to hit 22%

By James Robinson for MailOnline 

Supermarket consumers already dealing with a cost-of-living crunch are paying as much as 20 per cent extra for cabinet staples together with butter, milk and spaghetti, than they have been final 12 months, new figures have at present revealed.

With Britons already dealing with a double whammy of excessive gas and rising vitality costs, evaluation by MailOnline has revealed how a four-pint milk carton now prices, on common, 34p greater than it did 12 months in the past.

The price of a median 500g pack of own-brand spaghetti has additionally rocketed up by 33p – from 52p to 85p – since August final 12 months, whereas a 500g pack of Lurpak is now 63p dearer – up from £3.58 final 12 months to £4.21 this 12 months. 

Supermarkets are additionally dealing with a backlash from prospects over the price of baked bean. An common six-pack of Heinz baked beans now prices as a lot as £5 in some shops. A single 450g can will now, on common, set consumers again £1.20 – up greater than 37p in 12 months. 

Some are even pricing the favored cabinet staple at £1.45 per 415g can – sparking fury from prospects who have accused outlets of ‘taking the p**’.  It comes after Tesco briefly stopped stocking Heinz merchandise following a pricing row with the US-food agency.

Meanwhile, MailOnline’s evaluation additionally exhibits how a median 20 merchandise procuring basket now prices £5.20 greater than it did final 12 months – with consumers in Tesco and Morrisons seeing among the largest rises. 

It comes because the British Retail Consortium (BRC) – the commerce affiliation for supermarkets and retail companies – at present launched its personal figures exhibiting how costs have risen during the last 12 months.

Shop price annual inflation surged to five.1 per cent, up from 4.4 per cent in July, marking a brand new file because the British Retail Consortium (BRC) and NielsenIQ index began in 2005. 

Food costs leapt by 9.3 per cent after a 7.0 per cent enhance in July, pushed by will increase in merchandise reminiscent of milk, margarine and crisps, with Russia’s invasion of Ukraine pushing up the prices of animal feed, fertiliser, wheat and vegetable oils, the BRC mentioned. 

Meanwhile, Britons are already bracing for sky-high vitality payments this winter, when the price cap on vitality prices for a median dwelling are set to rise to £3,500-a-year in October – and so they might rise as £7,236 as of April.

Experts concern inflation might hit 22 per cent this winter, leaving hundreds of thousands unable to pay the payments and companies going to the wall – all whereas vitality companies are predicted to make £170billion additional in revenue.

Goldman Sachs predicts inflation, which hit a 40-year excessive of 10.1 per cent in July, will double in 2023 because the price cap on vitality payments continues to rise pushed up by hovering gasoline costs .

The rising price of meals and a weak pound are additionally contributing to the disaster that’s sending the UK in the direction of recession.

Today a commerce marketing consultant who spent 15 years as a purchaser for Waitrose warned that staple meals have been amongst these dealing with near-double digit inflation this 12 months – regardless of a drive by supermarkets to maintain their price down.

She additionally warned that inflation on branded and luxurious grocery store items could possibly be as excessive as 20 per cent in some circumstances.

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

With Britons already dealing with a double whammy of excessive gas and rising vitality costs, evaluation by MailOnline has revealed how a four-pint milk carton now prices, on common, 34p greater than it did 12 months in the past. The price of a median 500g pack of own-brand spaghetti has additionally rocketed up by 33p – from 52p to 85p – since August final 12 months, whereas a 500g pack of Lurpak is now 63p dearer – up from £3.58 final 12 months to £4.21 this 12 months

Experts fear inflation could hit 22 per cent this winter, leaving millions unable to pay the bills and businesses going to the wall - all while energy firms are predicted to make £170billion extra in profit. Goldman Sachs predicts inflation, which hit a 40-year high of 10.1 per cent in July, will double in 2023 as the price cap on energy bills continues to rise pushed up by soaring gas prices

Experts concern inflation might hit 22 per cent this winter, leaving hundreds of thousands unable to pay the payments and companies going to the wall – all whereas vitality companies are predicted to make £170billion additional in revenue. Goldman Sachs predicts inflation, which hit a 40-year excessive of 10.1 per cent in July, will double in 2023 because the price cap on vitality payments continues to rise pushed up by hovering gasoline costs 

It comes as Britain faces an inflation rate of 22 per cent this winter leaving millions unable to pay the bills and businesses going to the wall while energy firms are predicted to make £170billion extra in profits increasing pressure on the next Prime Minister to impose a windfall tax

It comes as Britain faces an inflation price of twenty-two per cent this winter leaving hundreds of thousands unable to pay the payments and companies going to the wall whereas vitality companies are predicted to make £170billion additional in earnings rising strain on the following Prime Minister to impose a windfall tax

It comes as the British Retail Consortium - the trade association for supermarkets and retail businesses - today released its own figures showing how prices have risen. Library image: A shopper carries a basket in a supermarket

It comes because the British Retail Consortium – the commerce affiliation for supermarkets and retail companies – at present launched its personal figures exhibiting how costs have risen. Library picture: A consumer carries a basket in a grocery store

Following the BRC’s announcement on meals price inflation at present, skilled Lydia Garrett, a former grocery store purchaser, was requested if she was stunned by the dimensions of the rise.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, she mentioned: ‘No, by no means. I’ve been seeing meals price rises for fairly numerous years.

How the price of on a regular basis objects has risen in the final 12 months 

Milk – 4 pints (personal model)  

Average price in August final 12 months: £1.16

Average price in August this 12 months: £1.50

Difference: £0.34

Spaghetti – 500g (personal model)

Average price in August final 12 months: £0.52

Average price in August this 12 months: £0.85

Difference: £0.32

Heinz beans – Six pack 

Average price in August final 12 months: £3.50

Average price in August this 12 months: £4.77

Difference: £1.27 

Lurpak – 500g

Average price in August final 12 months: £3.58

Average price in August this 12 months: £4.21

Difference: £0.63 

*Figures are a median based mostly on costs from the UK’s main supermarkets, utilizing knowledge from the Trolley.co.uk Grocery Price Index 

‘You at all times have a listing of procuring basket traces, so you might be very cautious about not elevating these costs, as a result of these are the merchandise individuals purchase in massive quantity.

‘So it is issues like sliced bread, milk, it is your fundamental merchandise that everybody needs to purchase. These are those that prospects discover what the costs are.

‘So supermarkets are very very targeted to ensure these costs should not being pushed up too excessive as a result of clearly it results their prospects and so they need their prospects to remain loyal to them. So they are going to do all the things they’ll to ensure these costs keep in line.

‘With these inflation figures popping out now, they’re pushing as much as 10 p.c, that is actually excessive to see it on these procuring basket traces, however all people can be feeling the costs greater than that, since you aren’t simply shopping for these procuring basket traces, you might be shopping for a number of different meals and inflation on extra premium meals can be a lot a lot greater than that.’ 

Ms Garrett warned that inflation on premium, or branded objects, could possibly be as excessive as 20 per cent – a lot greater than the UK’s official inflation figures.

Meanwhile, Mike Watkins, head of retailer and enterprise perception, NielsenIQ, who co-produces the info launched by the BRC, mentioned: ‘We can count on this stage of meals inflation to be with us for at the very least one other six months however hopefully among the enter price pressures in the provision chain will finally begin to ease.

‘However, with additional falls in disposable incomes coming this autumn as vitality prices rocket once more, retail spend will come underneath strain in the all-important closing quarter of the 12 months.”

Figures from the Trolley.co.uk’s Grocery Price Index counsel some objects have already hit 20 per cent inflation in a 12 months.

The index, which tracks the cost of items in major supermarkets across the UK, takes an average cost of an item over the last 12 months.

The figures include smaller and larger sizes, as well as branded and premium items – so the figures are sometimes higher than what you might pay for smaller non-branded packets.

They show how the average pack of spaghetti now costs £1.49 – up 29p – 23.1 per cent in the last 12 months.

Supermarket shoppers already facing a cost-of-living crunch are now paying up to 20 per cent more for cupboard staples including butter, milk and spaghetti, new figures have today revealed. Pictured: A graphic showing how items have increased in cost. Figures are from data from Trolley.co.uk's Grocery Price Index. The cost of items are averages, incorporating various sizes and brands. E.g. Milk includes organic and larger cartons. Pictures are an illustration and do not represent the actual price of the products

Supermarket shoppers already facing a cost-of-living crunch are now paying up to 20 per cent more for cupboard staples including butter, milk and spaghetti, new figures have today revealed. Pictured: A graphic showing how items have increased in cost. Figures are from data from Trolley.co.uk’s Grocery Price Index. The cost of items are averages, incorporating various sizes and brands. E.g. Milk includes organic and larger cartons. Pictures are an illustration and do not represent the actual price of the products

Meanwhile, an average 20 item shopping basket now costs on average £5.20 more than it did last year, the analysis shows, with shoppers in Tesco and Morrisons seeing some of the biggest rises. Pictured: A graphic showing how the price of an average 20 item basket of shopping - selected by MailOnline - has risen in the past 12 months. The figures are based on analysis of data by the Trolley.co.uk Grocery Price Index

Meanwhile, an average 20 item shopping basket now costs on average £5.20 more than it did last year, the analysis shows, with shoppers in Tesco and Morrisons seeing some of the biggest rises. Pictured: A graphic showing how the price of an average 20 item basket of shopping – selected by MailOnline – has risen in the past 12 months. The figures are based on analysis of data by the Trolley.co.uk Grocery Price Index

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

In terms of non-branded products, a 500g own-brand pack of spaghetti pack costs 84p – up 32p from an average of 52p last year – across the major supermarkets.

The average milk carton – ranging from 1pint to 6pint – now costs £1.34 – up 26.9 per cent in the last 12 months. Meanwhile, a 4pint now costs of average £1.16, up 34p when compared to August last year.

Another dairy product, Lurpak butter, has also seen a large rise in costs, going up on average 63p for a 500g tub since last August.

It comes after shoppers recently expressed shock that the price of a 750g tub of Lurpak surpassed £7 in some supermarkets. Meanwhile, cheese has also seen a 17 per cent rise in price in the last 12 months, according to figures from Trolley.co.uk. 

Dairy products have been impacted by Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Both countries are among the world’s biggest exporters of fertiliser and animal feed and the invasion has led to disrupted supplies and increase prices. 

Earlier this week, milk giant Arla warned it expected the second half of the year to be ‘even more challenging’ due to ‘on-going inflationary pressure and political unrest’.

Other large increases including in the cost of chicken breast. Figures from Trolley.co.uk show a 15.9 per cent increase in the price of the meat in the last 12 months. An average pack now costs £4.80, up 66p since August last year.

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

Eggs, bread and bathroom roll, all important objects, have additionally seen double digit inflation in the final 12 months, in response to the figures.

How an average twenty item shopping basket costs £5.20 more than it did in August last year

Milk

August 21: £1.34 – August 22: £1.70

Increase: £0.36

Eggs

August 21: £2.08 – August 22: £2.31

Increase: £0.23

Bread 

August 21: £1.12 – August 22: £1.26

Increase: £0.14

Toilet Roll 

August 21: £4.59 – August 22: £5.20

Increase: £0.61

Washing powder

August 21: £6.51 – August 22:£6.78

Increase: £0.27

Fruit

August 21: £1.99 – August 22: £2.13 

Increase: £0.14

Toothpaste 

August 21: £3.31 – August 22: £3.31 

Increase: None 

Cheese

August 21: £2.47 – August 22: £2.89

Increase: £0.42

Bag of potatoes

August 21: £1.47 – August 22: £1.58

Increase: £0.11

Beer

August 21: £7.09 – August 22: £7.22

Increase: £0.13

Shampoo

August 21: £3.91 – August 22: £3.96

Increase: £0.05

Spaghetti

August 21: £1.21 – August 22: £1.49

Increase: £0.28

Spreadable Butter

August 21: £3.11 – August 22: £3.87

Increase: £0.76

Baked Beans

August 21: £1.42 – August 22: £1.71

Increase: £0.29

Chicken Breast

August 21: £4.14 – August 22: £4.80

Increase: £0.66

Tea Bags

August 21: £3.01 – August 22: £3.17

Increase: £0.16

Ham

August 21: £1.79 – August 22: £1.96

Increase: £0.17

Crisps 

August 21: £1.57 – August 22: £1.69 

Increase: £0.12

Coffee 

August 21: £3.65 August 22: £3.93

Increase: £0.28

White wine

August 21: £7.95 – August 22: £7.97

Increase: £0.02

Total

August 21: £63.73 – August 22: £68.93 

Increase: £5.20

Figures are from data from Trolley.co.uk’s Grocery Price Index. The cost of items are averages, incorporating various sizes and brands. E.g. Milk includes organic and larger cartons.

The only below inflation rises have been for toothpaste – which has seen no significant price rises since August last year – and wine, which has only rise by 0.3 per cent in the last 12 months, the figures show.

Meanwhile, shampoo and beer have also seen small rises, of around two per cent, since August last year. 

The items are all included as part of MailOnline’s analysis of the cost of an average 20 shopping basket. According to the analysis, an average basket now costs  increased by more than £5 in the last 12 months.

An average basket, containing a mixture of essentials, toiletries and luxuries, now costs £68.93 – up £5.20 from £63.73 last year.

Of the major supermarkets, the largest increase was at Morrisons, which earlier this year was bought by a US investment firm.

The cost of MailOnline’s average basket came to £65.38 in August this year, up £5.21 on last year, a rise of 8.65 per cent. Tesco saw the next biggest rise, of £5.18, going from £63.66 to £68.84.

Asda remained the cheapest supermarket for a 20 item basket, at £62.56. But the Asda basket saw a rise of £4.94 (8.57 per cent) over the last 12 months.

According to the data, Iceland saw the largest rise, of 14.2 per cent, on the average shopping basket, going from £61.52 to £70.28 since August last year. Co-Op saw the smallest rise, of 4.2 per cent, with the average basket cost rising from £61.11 to £63.75.

It comes as Britain faces an inflation rate of 22 per cent this winter leaving millions unable to pay the bills and businesses going to the wall while energy firms are predicted to make £170billion extra in profits increasing pressure on the next Prime Minister to impose a windfall tax.

Goldman Sachs predicts inflation will double in 2023 as the price cap on energy bills continues to rise pushed up by soaring gas prices with the rising cost of food and a weak pound also contributing to the crisis that is sending the UK towards recession.

It got here as leaked Treasury forecasts, revealed by Bloomberg, revealed the spiraling disaster will massively revenue vitality giants as oil and gasoline producers are predicted to make an additional £170billion as households face the selection between consuming and heating this winter due to the price of disaster disaster. 

Pubs across the country that have been open for more than 200 years are closing their doors as their bills soar, with one heartbroken landlord admitting that they would have had to charge £14-a-pint and £40 for a main course to remain solvent.

John Crompton, 47, who runs The Fontmell Inn in Fontmell Magna, Dorset, said: ‘Our electric contract comes up for renewal in September, and the best quote we’ve had is £72,500. It’s gone up £52,000 per year, just on electric. And then gas that we use for cooking has gone up from about £8,000 to about £16,000 a year. It’s an impossible ask’.

Schools and hospitals may be forced to limit heating this winter, according to insiders. Half of 250 headteachers surveyed by the TES this week said rising energy bills will have a ‘catastrophic’ impact on their budget this year. Manchester’s University NHS Foundation Trust has said their annual bills will be up £4million next year.

Speaking in Dorset yesterday on his farewell tour, Boris Johnson has admitted that the outlook is bleak but predicted the country and its ‘heroic’ citizens would bounce back next year.

He said: ‘It is going to be tough in the months to come. It’s going to be tough through to next year. And that’s because of Putin’s war in Ukraine. Be in absolutely no doubt, the gas prices [are] being driven by what Putin did in Ukraine. But we are going to get through this.’  

The predictions of £170billion profits for energy firms will be delivered by Treasury officials to the next Prime Minister on September 6, putting pressure on them to impose another windfall tax to ease the energy crisis this winter.

A tax at the current windfall rate of 25 per cent would bring in billions of pounds for the Treasury to help give assistance to households through the cost of living crisis. 

But the likely winner of the Conservative leadership contest Liz Truss has said repeatedly she is against new taxes and instead wants to cut tax in an effort to create economic growth.

Ms Truss has insisted that a windfall tax on energy giants massive profits would ‘send the wrong message to investors’.

In a warning about what she faces if she beats Rishi Sunak, one insider said today: ‘This makes Covid-19 look relatively straightforward’.

A NHS source said: ‘The overriding problem for the new Downing Street incumbent is that, while in previous years problems in the NHS centered on specific areas, today the entire house is on fire’.

Energy firms have been raking it in since the energy crisis began. 

BP said in August its profits had hit a 14-year high as the gas giant made £6.9billion between April and June – up from £2.3 billion a year ago.

Shell’s profits hit almost £10 billion in the same period, while Centrica – the UK’s biggest gas supplier – saw profits increase by five times to £1.3 billion. Both companies paid out millions in dividends to their shareholders.  

Graphs show how energy bills could reach a stunning £7,263 by next year

Graphs show how energy bills could reach a stunning £7,263 by next year 

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

 UK gas prices are soaring after Russia began throttling off supplies to Europe, causing a global shortage as EU leaders scramble for supplies

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

EU prices are at near-record levels amid fears Russia could soon turn off the gas tap completely, with leaders already discussing energy rationing

Ofgem introduced this week the vitality price cap would rise to £3,549 for common UK households, making payments unaffordable for individuals throughout the nation.

Britain faces 22% inflation by January as energy giants are predicted to rake in £17BILLION EXTRA profits over next two years driven by Ofgem price cap 

Britain faces an inflation rate of 22 per cent this winter leaving millions unable to pay the bills and businesses going to the wall while energy firms are predicted to make £170billion extra in profits increasing pressure on the next Prime Minister to impose a windfall tax.

Goldman Sachs predicts inflation will double in 2023 as the price cap on energy bills continues to rise pushed up by soaring gas prices with the rising cost of food and a weak pound also contributing to the crisis that is sending the UK towards recession.

It got here as leaked Treasury forecasts, revealed by Bloomberg, revealed the spiraling disaster will massively revenue vitality giants as oil and gasoline producers are predicted to make an additional £170billion as households face the selection between consuming and heating this winter due to the price of disaster disaster. 

Pubs across the country that have been open for more than 200 years are closing their doors as their bills soar, with one heartbroken landlord admitting that they would have had to charge £14-a-pint and £40 for a main course to remain solvent.

John Crompton, 47, who runs The Fontmell Inn in Fontmell Magna, Dorset, said: ‘Our electric contract comes up for renewal in September, and the best quote we’ve had is £72,500. It’s gone up £52,000 per year, just on electric. And then gas that we use for cooking has gone up from about £8,000 to about £16,000 a year. It’s an impossible ask’.

Schools and hospitals may be forced to limit heating this winter, according to insiders. Half of 250 headteachers surveyed by the TES this week said rising energy bills will have a ‘catastrophic’ impact on their budget this year. Manchester’s University NHS Foundation Trust has said their annual bills will be up £4million next year.

Speaking in Dorset yesterday on his farewell tour, Boris Johnson has admitted that the outlook is bleak but predicted the country and its ‘heroic’ citizens would bounce back next year.

He said: ‘It is going to be tough in the months to come. It’s going to be tough through to next year. And that’s because of Putin’s war in Ukraine. Be in absolutely no doubt, the gas prices [are] being driven by what Putin did in Ukraine. But we are going to get through this.’  

The predictions of £170billion profits for energy firms will be delivered by Treasury officials to the next Prime Minister on September 6, putting pressure on them to impose another windfall tax to ease the energy crisis this winter.

A tax at the current windfall rate of 25 per cent would bring in billions of pounds for the Treasury to help give assistance to households through the cost of living crisis. 

But the likely winner of the Conservative leadership contest Liz Truss has said repeatedly she is against new taxes and instead wants to cut tax in an effort to create economic growth. Ms Truss has insisted that a windfall tax on energy giants massive profits would ‘send the wrong message to investors’. In a warning about what she faces if she beats Rishi Sunak, one insider said today: ‘This makes Covid-19 look relatively straightforward’. A NHS source said: ‘The overriding problem for the new Downing Street incumbent is that, while in previous years problems in the NHS centered on specific areas, today the entire house is on fire’.

 

US investment bank Goldman Sachs has predicted the price cap could rise by yet another 80 per cent by next year.

The bank added inflation could also reach 22.4 per cent in 2023 – slashing Britain’s GDP by 2.3 per cent. 

A windfall tax imposed in May is predicted by the Treasury to generate £5 billion in its first year.

Legislation passed in July allows the tax to run until 2025 – it allows companies to lower the impact of the tax if they invest in oil and gas production that could increase the supply of energy.

The government has so far rejected imposing the windfall tax on electricity producers because rising gas prices have pushed up the price the producers can charge.

Some electricity producers have seen an increase in profits even when they have supplied less energy.

The leaked figures show 40 per cent of the £170 billion extra profits are made by energy producers. 

The Treasury said it did not recognise the figures, and pointed to the money that would be raised by May’s windfall tax.

This month shoppers in Britain have seen their grocery bills surge at the fastest rate since at least 2008 as the cost-of-living crisis continues to bite – with the biggest price spikes on dog food, butter, milk and chicken.

Research firm Kantar revealed that annual grocery price inflation at UK supermarkets jumped to 11.6 per cent for the four weeks to August 7 against the same period last year, compared with 9.9 per cent in the previous month.

The rate is the highest since the company started tracking supermarket prices in this way 14 years ago – and equates to a £533 annual increase in the average UK household’s grocery bill, or £10.25 every week.

As a result, it reported sales of own-label value products increased by almost a fifth – 19.7 per cent – as shoppers sought to make savings. It came as overall supermarket sales rose by 2.2 per cent in the 12 weeks to August 7.

Over those 12 weeks, the price of butter rose by 25.1 per cent, ahead of dog food at 23.6 per cent and milk at 23.5 per cent. Kantar added that over the last four weeks, mineral water was up by 23 per cent amid the hot weather.

Consumers appear to be now shopping around more and switching supermarkets in response to the cost-of-living crunch, after inflation rose to 9.4 per cent and is set to hit 13.3 per cent according to Bank of England estimates.

Kantar said Lidl was once again the fastest growing supermarket chain, with sales up by 17.9 per cent over the latest 12 weeks. Rival German discounter Aldi also performed strongly, reporting 14.4 per cent growth.

While customers were attracted to the two firms’ cheaper product lines, it was also a good period for Tesco which was the strongest performer among the UK’s biggest grocers and reported 1 per cent growth.

Meanwhile, Asda saw sales increase by 0.2 per cent and Sainsbury’s recorded a 0.1 per cent dip. The worst performer of the big four was Morrisons, which saw sales decline by 4.9 per cent.

Fraser McKevitt, head of retail and consumer insight at Kantar, said: ‘As predicted, we’ve now hit a new peak in grocery price inflation, with products like butter, milk and poultry in particular seeing some of the biggest jumps.

‘This rise means that the average annual shop is set to increase by a staggering £533, or £10.25 every week, if consumers buy the same products as they did last year.

‘It’s not surprising that we’re seeing shoppers make lifestyle changes to deal with the extra demands on their household budgets.’

Recent hot weather also resulted in a surge in sales of soft drinks, ice cream and summer clothes, according to the research.

Mr McKevitt added: ‘As the mercury climbs, shoppers have turned to mineral water and soft drinks to cool off. Sales of both products are up by 23 per cent and 10 per cent respectively in the latest four weeks.

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

#UK PRET-flation! How lunchtime favourites have soared in price #UKnews

A customer shops at a supermarket in London on July 20 as UK inflation is now at a 40-year high of 9.4 per cent

A customer shops at a supermarket in London on July 20 as UK inflation is now at a 40-year high of 9.4 per cent

Grocery market share data for the 12 weeks ending August 7, 2022 shows that Tesco is still the leader by some distance

Grocery market share data for the 12 weeks ending August 7, 2022 shows that Tesco is still the leader by some distance

HOW SUPERMARKET CHAINS’ MARKET SHARE IS CHANGING – WITH TESCO STILL THE CLEAR UK LEADER 
Total Till Roll – Consumer Spend12 weeks to 8/8/2021 (£m)Share (%)12 weeks to 7/8/2022 (£m)Share (%)Change YoY (%)
Total Grocers 29,534100.00%30,171100.00%2.20%
Total Multiples29,01598.20%29,67798.40%2.30%
Tesco8,03427.20%8,11526.90%1.00%
Sainsbury’s4,48015.20%4,47614.80%-0.10%
Asda4,19514.20%4,20413.90%0.20%
Morrisons2,94810.00%2,8059.30%-4.90%
Aldi2,4138.20%2,7619.10%14.40%
Lidl1,7896.10%2,1107.00%17.90%
Co-op1,9466.60%1,9536.50%0.40%
Waitrose1,4614.90%1,3804.60%-5.50%
Iceland6862.30%7052.30%2.80%
Ocado5191.80%5511.80%6.20%
Other Multiples5451.80%6172.00%13.20%
Symbols & Independents5191.80%4941.60%-4.80%

‘Unsurprisingly, ice lotions are additionally common with 18 per cent 12 months on 12 months progress, up by 4 share factors on the earlier month.

Sainsbury’s to pump £65million into pricing next month amid inflation pressures 

Sainsbury’s has said it will pump £65 million into its pricing next month amid ratcheting pressure on customers’ budgets.

Simon Roberts, chief executive of the supermarket chain, promised the brand will stand with its customers “to ease the monetary strain they face”.

The latest pricing pledge – which is part of wider a £500 million investment commitment – comes as fresh figures from the British Retail Consortium (BRC) reveal that customers witnessed 9.3% food inflation in August, compared with the same month last year.

The UK’s second largest grocery chain said £60 million of its latest cash injection will go towards food prices in September.

It said this will predominantly go towards the Price Lock campaign which freezes the price of a raft of its most popular products.

Around 2,000 food products and household items have had their prices fixed for at least eight weeks, including a number of own label lines.

Sainsbury’s said funding will also go towards its price match campaign against discounter rival Aldi.

‘Adapting to the changing temperatures, we’re expanding our summer wardrobes too, now that there are no restrictions on travel or going outside. Sales of clothes intended for summer holidays like shorts, sundresses, caps and swimming costumes, have increased by 163 per cent.’

Own-label ranges are now at record levels of popularity, with sales rising by 7.3 per cent and holding 51.6 per cent of the market compared with branded products, which is the biggest share Kantar has ever recorded.

With inflation so high and a potential recession on the way, Kantar said comparisons against the last financial crisis are becoming visible.

Mr McKevitt added: ‘People are shopping around between the retailers to find the best value products, but back in 2008 there was much more of a reliance on promotions.

‘It’s harder to hunt out these deals in 2022 – the number of products sold on promotion is at 24.7 per cent for the four weeks to August 7, 2022, while 14 years ago it was at 30 per cent.

‘Instead, supermarkets are currently pointing shoppers towards their everyday low prices, value-ranges and price matches instead.

‘Over the past month we’ve really seen retailers expand and advertise their own value ranges across the store to reflect demand. Consumers are welcoming the different choices and options being made available to them on the shelves, with sales of own-label value products increasing by 19.7 per cent this month.

‘As an example, Asda’s Just Essentials line, which launched this summer, is already in 33 per cent of its customers’ baskets.’

Lidl, which has now raised its market share to 7 per cent, has been boosted by the popularity of its dairy goods and bakery lines. Its 17.9 per cent growth figure over the last 12 weeks is the retailer’s highest since September 2017. 

Aldi additionally elevated market share by 0.9 share factors to 9.1 per cent.

Now Sainsbury’s scraps ‘best before’ labels: Supermarket claims it will stop 17M fresh food items going to waste – joining Tesco, Asda, Waitrose and M&S 

Sainsbury’s has joined competitors in removing ‘best before’ labels from a swathe of fresh produce to combat the cost of living crisis by reducing waste.

Citrus fruits, pears, onions and tomatoes will be available for purchase from the end of August with no date labels in a move the supermarket claims has the potential to cut annual household food waste by 11,000 tonnes – or 17 million items.

In total, more than 230 products will be impacted by the decision. A further 1,500 food items including pineapples, pumpkins and apples are already without date labels. 

Sainsbury’s will also remove ‘use by’ dates from 46 own-brand yoghurts and instead switch to ‘best before’ dates to give customers more autonomy in deciding whether it is okay to eat.

Up to 54,000 tonnes of yoghurt is wasted annually and up to 70 per cent of consumers cited the date label as the primary reason for throwing often unopened tubs out, research by the Waste & Resources Action Programme (Wrap) found. 

The decision comes amid exorbitant rises in the cost of living throughout the UK, with cash-strapped families facing a £454 jump in annual grocery bills.

Tesco was the first retailer in the UK to implement the changes back in 2018. More recently, Asda, Lidl, Waitrose and Marks & Spencer have also introduced the policy.

Tesco was the first retailer in the UK to implement the changes back in 2018. More recently, Asda, Lidl, Waitrose and Marks & Spencer have also introduced the policy. Aldi is yet to pass a similar policy

Tesco was the first retailer in the UK to implement the changes back in 2018. More recently, Asda, Lidl, Waitrose and Marks & Spencer have also introduced the policy. Aldi is yet to pass a similar policy

Kate Stein, Director of Technical at Sainsbury’s said the move will help customers save money by making their food shop stretch further. 

‘The changes we’re announcing… give customers more autonomy to make their own decisions on whether their food is good to eat,’ she said. 

The vast majority of food waste makes its way to landfill where it releases methane gas – accounting for up to 10 per cent of greenhouse gas emissions globally.

Ms Stein said Sainsbury’s decision reflected a commitment to reducing waste and supporting customers as the cost of living continues to rise.

A new label reading ‘no date helps reduce waste’ will replace date stickers on fresh produce impacted by the changes. 

The decision comes after Wrap released a study which revealed some fruits and vegetables can be eaten up to 10 weeks beyond their best before dates if they’re kept in optimal conditions.

The study found storing cucumber and broccoli at 4°C added an additional 15 days onto the shelf life, while keeping apples in the fridge extended their life by 70 days.

‘If people stored more fresh produce in the fridge and maintained their fridge temperature below 5°C, fruit and vegetables would stay fresher for longer and people would have much longer to use what they purchase,’ the study concluded.

Sainsbury's (pictured) will also remove ¿use by¿ dates from 46 own-brand yoghurts and instead switch to ¿best before¿ dates to give customers more autonomy in deciding whether it is okay to eat

Sainsbury’s (pictured) will also remove ‘use by’ dates from 46 own-brand yoghurts and instead switch to ‘best before’ dates to give customers more autonomy in deciding whether it is okay to eat

Where a ‘use by’ date is linked to food safety, a ‘best before’ date simply offers a guide as to when food is in its prime for consumption.

Many customers use the two interchangeably and toss food once it reaches the ‘best before’ date. 

Dr Christian Reynolds, Senior Lecturer in Food Policy at City, University of London, said while flavour and texture may change beyond a best before date, it’s ultimately still safe to eat.

He recommended using sensory cues to find out if the food is okay to eat.

‘You could look for visible mould on bread, taste to see if biscuits/crisps are stale, or sniff/smell some dairy products with a best before date to see if they have soured,’ he advised.

Last week, Asda announced its intention to remove ‘best before’ dates from almost 250 fresh fruit and vegetable products from September 1, following Waitrose and Marks & Spencer removing the dates from hundreds of fresh products and Tesco leading the way when it got rid of them from more than 100 items in 2018. 

Meanwhile in January, Morrisons announced plans to remove ‘use by’ dates on milk and encourage consumers to use a ‘sniff test’ instead to determine if it is okay to consume. 

Fraser McKevitt, head of retail and consumer insight at Kantar, said the UK is in the midst of the second highest inflation period for groceries since 2008.

‘With grocery price inflation at almost 10%, people are now facing a £454 increase to their annual grocery bills.’

Among the biggest price hikes were for milk, butter and dog food – jumping up to 20 per cent in the 12 weeks to July compared to the same period in 2021.

Burgers, halloumi and coleslaw all costing 13 per cent, 17 per cent and 14 per cent more than the same time last year, according to fresh industry data from market researchers Kantar.

Supply chain issues and labour pressures have added to costs in food production, which are now being fed back to shoppers.

 

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